on the shores //

‘naturalia, artificialia, exotica, scientifica, mirabilia’ & ‘hunting’, 2024
group exhibition created in Itoshima, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan
during residency at Studio Kura.

by collecting, gathering, discovering, digging, and photographing remnants of what the fishing industry leaves behind at sea on the shores of Itoshima, the series of pieces explores what our waste stream can look like

the work is informed by the Cabinet of Curiosities (Wunderkammer), originated during the European Renaissance. Scholars and noblemen sought to rationalise and understand the world, driven by the belief that all things are related to each other, by collecting pieces from the five categories ‘naturalia, artificialia, exotica, scientifica, mirabilia’, which provided the title of the series. they often lacked labels and the lines between ‘human and animal, natural and artificial’ were often blurred.
the photography series accompanied, visualises the setting and state in which these obejcts were found. they show the beaty in decay and loss of value over time as well as emphasize the colors that there are to be found in our waste streams.


the intention is to give a new round of life to the objects, materials, and elements through manipulation, textile techniques and photography. finding curiosity in discarded material whilst bringing attention to our waste streams. potentially rethinking or contemplating how and what we dispose of elements.

‘naturalia, artificialia, exotica, scientifica, mirabilia’ (9 sculptures):
/between 60-180cm long & 1-20cm wide/
stone, ceramic, glaze, yarn, fishing net, rope, seashells, fabric

‘hunting’ (9 photographs)
each /27 x 40cm/

group exhibition created in Itoshima, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. during residency at Studio Kura.

by collecting, gathering, discovering, digging, and photographing remnants of what the fishing industry leaves behind at sea on the shores of Itoshima, the series of pieces explores what our waste stream can look like

the work is informed by the Cabinet of Curiosities (Wunderkammer), originated during the European Renaissance. Scholars and noblemen sought to rationalise and understand the world, driven by the belief that all things are related to each other, by collecting pieces from the five categories ‘naturalia, artificialia, exotica, scientifica, mirabilia’, which provided the title of the series. they often lacked labels and the lines between ‘human and animal, natural and artificial’ were often blurred. the photography series accompanied, visualises the setting and state in which these obejcts were found. they show the beaty in decay and loss of value over time as well as emphasize the colors that there are to be found in our waste streams.

the intention is to give a new round of life to the objects, materials, and elements through manipulation, textile techniques and photography. finding curiosity in discarded material whilst bringing attention to our waste streams. potentially rethinking or contemplating how and what we dispose of elements.


Texture based sculpture showing the inhibition of chronic body pain. A culmination of inhibitions I have felt throughout my life, an analysis of constraining factors and body pains and how the body all of a sudden cannot do what it is suppose to or could before. Yet a optimistic approach to the never ending pain. The texture of the textiles are mimiking and drawn from pain, bones, textures within the body. It reflects on positivity in the face of pain through colors. It depicts how I relate to my pain through an optimistic lens, that I carry because the inhibition will not subside. The sculpture focuses on the pain in the ankle area. The sense of losing control, feeling numb, stuck and caught in ones movement. A certain wobbly feeling apears around the ankles which limits walking. The sculpture allows people to feel the pain when stepping into it, without me giving an explanation. longlasting handcrafted techniques are mixed, such as weaving, machine knitting and hand knitting, only made out of reclaimed and repuposed materials, such as foam, cotton, organza, linen, thread and knitted yarns. an exploration of sensitivities. M